Greater Manchester no longer has a Police and Crime Commissioner.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester has now taken responsibility for policing and crime.

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Greater Manchester no longer has a Police and Crime Commissioner. The Mayor of Greater Manchester has now taken responsibility for policing and crime.

Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner

Jim Battle - Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner

Jim Battle was appointed Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner in August 2013.

He fulfils a number of roles to support the Police and Crime Commissioner including:

  • Chair of the Greater Manchester Mental Health Partnership Board
  • Chair of the Greater Manchester Domestic Violence Reduction Board
  • Member of the Police Professional Standards Reform Board
  • Member of the independent Police Ethics Committee
  • Member of the Protest and Demonstration Panel
  • Member of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners Mental Health Panel
  • Member of the Home Office National Surveillance Camera Advisory Council
  • Member of the Greater Manchester Police and Crime Panel
  • Member of the Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner’s Forum
  • Member of the Greater Manchester Crime and Disorder Reduction Board

Jim is particularly passionate around the issues of hate crime, domestic violence and mental health, and has served the public for more than 30 years, working for a range of charities, local authorities and housing groups.

He has been involved in Greater Manchester’s Hate Crime Awareness Week since its inception in Manchester in 2013 and is a founding member of Manchester’s Challenge Hate Forum.

Jim was formerly the Deputy Leader of Manchester City Council, a position he held from 2004 to 2013. During his tenure at Manchester City Council, Jim was one of the leading voices in the community safety arena, not just in Greater Manchester but across the United Kingdom. 

He was responsible for setting up the city’s approach to dealing with crime and disorder and has represented the city region on a national level. He has successfully lobbied prime ministers, deputy prime ministers and home secretaries from all the main political parties on behalf of the people of Greater Manchester. 

As well as developing three crime and disorder reduction strategies for Manchester, Jim has been instrumental in the practical delivery of community safety projects. 

These have included groundbreaking initiatives to target guns and gangs, responding effectively to the riots in 2011 and improving Manchester City Council’s approach to dealing with hate crime. 

He has also been instrumental in bringing communities together to celebrate their success. Examples include initiating Manchester’s St George’s Day festivities and the Be Proud Awards, where each year community champions are recognised for the positive impact they’ve had in their neighbourhoods. 

Jim was born in Bradford in West Yorkshire, but has lived in Greater Manchester for most of his life. He has strong family ties across the region, with family members in Wigan, Leigh and Bolton, as well as Manchester.

Appointment

Jim was appointed on Friday 26 July 2013, following an open and independent selection process.

Sixteen people applied for the role, and an independent panel selected five for interview. 

The panel comprised: Rochdale Council leader and chair of the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities Police and Crime Steering Group, Councillor Colin Lambert; independent Police and Crime Panel member, Maqsood Ahmad; and former Manchester Evening News editor Paul Horrocks. 

The panel interviewed the five candidates before putting forward three for Tony to interview and make the final decision.

As part of the application process, candidates were asked to answer a series of questions about their suitability for the role. 

Salary

The Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner is paid £55,000 per year.

Freedom of information

View our freedom of information page for more information about gifts and hospitality, and the register of interests.

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