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Greater Manchester no longer has a Police and Crime Commissioner. The Mayor of Greater Manchester has now taken responsibility for policing and crime.

Commissioner calls on communities to stand together as anti-Semitic report published

Greater Manchester’s Police and Crime Commissioner has called on communities to stand together against hate crime as an annual report into anti-Semitic incidents is published. 

Tony Lloyd was speaking as the Community Security Trust published its annual study into incidents against the Jewish community in the UK. 

It shows that overall reported incidents have shown a reduction. In Greater Manchester, the figure has remained stable, with two more reported incidents than last year. Last year’s figures showed a significant drop in Greater Manchester, bucking the national trend. 

In Greater Manchester and London, an “incident exchange programme” operates whereby police and the CST systematically share information about hate crime. This has been in operation for several years and has dramatically improved confidence within Greater Manchester’s Jewish communities to report hate crime. 

But Tony added the shocking incidents outlined in the report shows that society has a long way to go before hate crime is eradicated from our society. 

“Hate crime is a scourge on our society and we must all take a stand against it. It’s never acceptable to attack, abuse or insult people just because of who they are. 

“I strongly welcome this report by the Community Security Trust as it highlights the great work that can be done when police and communities work together. I believe that the close cooperation between the CST and GMP sets the UK standard in terms of building community confidence to come forward to report hate crime. 

“It’s really important that victims of hate crime believe police when they say they take hate crime seriously and that’s what’s happening in Greater Manchester. The incident exchange programme is a great illustration of what can be achieved when police work with local communities. 

“This shouldn’t make us complacent – the CST has outlined some shocking incidents of hatred here in Greater Manchester. The idea that 11-year-old children throw stones at passers-by while shouting anti-Semitic abuse here in Greater Manchester is chilling and shows why we need to continue to work together to build a tolerant society.”

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